Change is good sometimes, right? Italian Fashion Designer, Riccardo Tisci, was appointed Burberry’s new Creative Chief Officer in recent months — He’s here to stay, and has definitely stirred up the pot with Burberry’s new branding.

Header photo by: Jason Lloyd Evans

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The #ThomasBurberryMonogram takes over our flagship store in Milan, Italy

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Change within an entity as iconic as Burberry is both exciting and concerning – especially when it’s kept it’s classic image for years. The London brand was taken into a whole new direction with the recent change of it’s logo and monogram, courtesy of Tisci — which of course had both negative and positive audience reactions, as most changes do. For the people who dislike Burberry’s new branding, the question is; Is the new logo a poor attempt at a shift from traditional to modern? Or is it brilliant and we’re just slow adapters to change?

 

The fresh logo was designed in a mere 4 weeks, an extremely limited amount of time for such an impactful change within a fashion house. Created by British Graphic Designer Peter Saville, the new logo embeds a more-so minimalist aspect. The new vibrant and bubbly monogram pattern now includes the “TB” initials from original founder Thomas Burberry. The monogram design received a warm welcome amongst the fashion industry, whereas the logo received a little more criticism due to it’s over-simplicity.

Riccardo Tisci, former creative director of Givenchy women’s haute couture, officially unveiled his first collection with Burberry at London Fashion Week yesterday afternoon. The SS19 runway showcased Tisci’s creative talents at an old London warehouse turned posh. It presented his personal vision of the evolving brand, demonstrated in 3 sections — “Refined”, “Relaxed”, and “Evening.”

 

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burberry fashion

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Tisci’s collection first started off as what seemed to be a classic, traditional take on Burberry’s known image — opening the show with the brand’s iconic trench coat. Further on, the show was perfectly balanced with a transition to streetwear looks, while incorporating aspects of the British neo-punk era. This included a variety of both men and women’s industrial looks with models strutting in chic pixie cuts. Many of the women’s looks were feminine and classic incorporating beige and brassy tones, whereas the men’s looks embedded darker palettes.

 

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burberry fashion

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burberry fashion ss19

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Of course it can be said Tisci’s approach for the first collection was well thought-out and methodical, considering he appealed to Burberry’s original following and audience with it’s traditional sharp aesthetic. However, it’s modern aspect was found in strategically attracting newer generations with his streetwear silhouettes, animal prints, and industrial looks — Tisci’s forté.

Amongst all of the 134 looks, Tisci overall kept the clean, sharp aesthetic to the Burberry fan. With his background at Givenchy and reputation for space-age minimalism/gothic inspiration, he gracefully incorporated his creative touch while maintaining the brand’s original look. It was a dazzling influential night in London, establishing the beginning of a new era in the iconic British fashion label.

To shop the brand, visit their website www.burberry.com or visit their instagram @burberry.

 

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